Science fiction writer Joe Haldeman discusses unplugging to create » Copper Robot

Joe Haldeman is no Luddite. As a science fiction writer, speculating about advanced technology is his business. In real life, he’s a dedicated Mac user, carries an iPhone in his pocket, and he’s looking forward to getting an iPad in a few weeks.

But when it comes time to write the latest of his two-dozen novels, he unplugs from the Internet and other digital distractions.

“I get up around 4:30 or so, and just make some coffee, and write for a couple of hours in longhand out on the porch,” he told me in the latest Copper Robot Podcast. “My porch doesn’t have any electricity, but I have little oil lamps. I light up a couple of oil lamps, and it’s all quiet. I like the soft light. And I just write. I write into blank books, usually spiral-bound books.” He writes using fountain pens.

via Science fiction writer Joe Haldeman discusses unplugging to create » Copper Robot.

Atlantic tech canon

Nearly every topic has a canon, a set of classics that you need to know. These works are recognized as key touchpoints of analysis and understanding. Technology, though, seems to resist that sort of thing. We think of it as something that is changing too fast for anything to remain relevant for long.

But it is precisely because technology does change that its lasting works are so important. What remains after round after around of creative destruction has proven its value. Many of the works that reach that threshold are scholarship, but certainly not all of them. We tried to reach deep and wide with this canon. We began with more than 200 suggestions from tech writers and scholars on Twitter and whittled them down to this core group.

A practical, bioinformatic workflow system for lar… [Nucleic Acids Res. 2010] – PubMed result

Nucleic Acids Res. 2010 Aug 3. [Epub ahead of print]A practical, bioinformatic workflow system for large data sets generated by next-generation sequencing.Cantacessi C, Jex AR, Hall RS, Young ND, Campbell BE, Joachim A, Nolan MJ, Abubucker S, Sternberg PW, Ranganathan S, Mitreva M, Gasser RB.Department of Veterinary Science, The University of Melbourne, 250 Princes Highway, Werribee, Victoria 3030, Australia, Institute of Parasitology, Department of Pathobiology, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, A-1210 Vienna, Austria, Genome Sequencing Center, Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, MO 63108, Biology Division, California Institute of Technology, CA 91125, USA and Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales 2109, Australia.

via A practical, bioinformatic workflow system for lar… [Nucleic Acids Res. 2010] – PubMed result.

Next generation tools for genomic data generation,… [BMC Bioinformatics. 2010] – PubMed result

BMC Bioinformatics. 2010 Sep 9;11(1):455. [Epub ahead of print]

Next generation tools for genomic data generation, distribution, and visualization.

Nix DA, Di Sera TL, Dalley BK, Milash BA, Cundick RM, Quinn KS, Courdy SJ.

Abstract

ABSTRACT:

BACKGROUND: With the rapidly falling cost and availability of high throughput sequencing and microarray technologies, the bottleneck for effectively using genomic analysis in the laboratory and clinic is shifting to one of effectively managing, analyzing, and sharing genomic data.

RESULTS: Here we present three open-source, platform independent, software tools for generating, analyzing, distributing, and visualizing genomic data. These include a next generation sequencing / microarray LIMS and analysis project center (GNomEx); an application for annotating and programmatically distributing genomic data using the community vetted DAS/2 data exchange protocol (GenoPub); and a standalone Java Swing application (GWrap) that makes cutting edge command line analysis tools available to those who prefer graphical user interfaces. Both GNomEx and GenoPub use the rich client Flex/Flash web browser interface to interact with Java classes and a relational database on a remote server. Both employ a public-private user-group security model enabling controlled distribution of patient and unpublished data alongside public resources. As such, they function as genomic data repositories that can be accessed manually or programmatically through DAS/2-enabled client applications such as the Integrated Genome Browser.

CONCLUSIONS: These tools have gained wide use in our core facilities, research laboratories and clinics and are freely available for non-profit use. See http://sourceforge.net/projects/gnomex/, http://sourceforge.net/projects/genoviz/, and http://sourceforge.net/projects/useq.

PMID: 20828407 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

via Next generation tools for genomic data generation,… [BMC Bioinformatics. 2010] – PubMed result.